Landlords’ Responsibility For Injured Third-Parties in Georgia

A recent Georgia Court of Appeals case examines the issue of a landlords’ liability for injuries to a third-party. The case, Forsh v. Williams, A12A2248 (3/20/2013), involved a non-tenant injured by a tenant’s dogs.

The injured party alleged the landlord was negligent and reckless in failing to adequately screen his tenants, failing to enter into an agreement whereby the tenants were prohibited from having and keeping vicious dogs, failing to adequately inspect the premises, and failing to comply with legal requirements under state and federal law for ownership of rental property. The injured party also alleged the landlord failed to keep the premises in repair – as required under OCGA § 44-7-14 – by not installing an appropriate gate on the deck from which the dogs escaped, and failing to install fencing in the yard after knowing of the presence the dogs.

Under Georgia law, to be liable for injuries to third-parties, out-of-possession landlords are responsible to third-parties for defective construction or for failure to keep the premises in repair.

OCGA § 44-7-14, entitled “Tort liability of landlord,” provides: “Having fully parted with possession and the right of possession, the landlord is not responsible to third persons for damages resulting from the negligence or illegal use of the premises by the tenant; provided, however, the landlord is responsible for damages arising from defective construction or for damages arising from the failure to keep the premises in repair.”

As long as landlord fixes defective construction and keeps the property in repair, presumably, the landlord is immune from claims from the third parties. The allegations referenced above, which include screening tenants and taking other proactive steps, go beyond a landlord’s responsibility in OCGA § 44-7-14.

So what did the court of appeals do? The court focused mostly on procedural issues, reversing the trial court and finding the landlord was not entitled to an outright dismissal at an early stage of the litigation. In favor of the landlord, the court ruled against the injured party on her claim under 42 USCS § 1437 et. seq., commonly referred to as Section 8. The injured party alleged landlord failed to comply with Housing Quality Standards requiring adequate infrastructure to keep the dogs confined either on the deck, in a suitable fence, or otherwise. The court of appeals found this federal statute couldn’t be a basis for liability, and an injured party’s claim is limited to OCGA § 44-7-14.

If you have any questions about Georgia landlord liability for injuries, please call us at 404-382-9994. We have twenty years of experience handling these cases.

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